Thursday, October 9, 2014

Where Is My Glycerin River?!

What is glycerin river?  In most cases it happens when you use water dispersible titanium dioxide to color your soap batter white and then the soap gelled.  Can't imagine it?  Here's a picture to show you:
Most of us trying very hard to avoid it.  One of the trick is not to gel the soap.  Another trick is not to use water dispersible titanium dioxide, instead, use oil dispersible version.  If you don't like these 2 options, heavily discount your water when you make lye solution would work too.
But, what if I want glycerin river?!  Should be easy, right?!  Not in this case!
I had this grant design idea to mimic the cracking of Arctic ice like this picture:
I soaped normally, didn't discount water, added descent amount of water dispersible titanium dioxide, even put it in the preheated oven to force gel.  So, where is my glycerin river when I intentionally tried to make it?!


The only difference is I also used transparent melt and pour soap to swirl the bottom blue portion for water effect.  Could it be the melt & pour?  Melt & pour soap does contain lots of glycerin that why it tends to sweat in humid area.  Could that be the reason I'm not getting the glycerin river I wanted?!  There got to be a reasonable logic to this right?

8 comments:

  1. I love the way you experiment!

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  2. It looks wonderful this way! Just think that it was snowing yesterday, that hides the ditsces :)

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  3. The dreaded glycerin rivers that turned into a beautiful design! Your soaps are still stunning. Those blues are magnificent =)

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  4. I got the same problem(liquid glycerine)... thanks for the solution

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  5. Hah I am so jealous! I have to take many steps and it's taken so many many experiments just to keep the glycerine rivers to a minimum :)

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